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Ferguson Revisited: Healthstyles on August 27th

wbaiThis week’s Healthstyles program is an interview that first aired on March 19th on racism and health/wellbeing. Producers Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Kenya Beard, EdD, NP-C, interview Willie Tolliver, PhD, MSW, professor in the School of Social Work at Hunter College and three of his social work students: Jason Cartwright, James Gilliam, and Kim Wolfe. The repeated public examples of subtle and blatant racism demonstrate the importance of conversations about the role of racism in the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities. As part of Healthstyles’ ongoing series on health disparities, this program examines these issues through an authentic and candid discussions about the deaths of Eric Gardner and Michael Brown, the social work students’ own experiences with racism, and how it plays out in the lives of all of us.

This interview first aired on Healthstyles on March 19th and can be heard at http://centerforhealthmediapolicy.com/2015/03/19/8410/

Or tune in on Thursday, August 27th, to WBAI, 99.5.FM in New York City, or go to http://www.wbai.org to listen to the program online.

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Integrative Nurse Coaching

For most us, being told to eat better and being handed a piece of paper with a list of new food options doesn’t get us to make that leap to change the way we eat.
That’s true when we need to move from a sedentary lifestyle to committing to walking a mile a day or taking up an exercise routine. Making behavioral life changes that are sustainable is hard. Otherwise, we’ll all just do it.
You are not alone when it comes to resistance.
That’s where nurse coaching can make a difference – particularly if you are living with a chronic condition or facing an illness and these changes can reduce pain and maybe get out you out bed in the morning to face the day’s challenges.
Tune in to Healthstyles Thursday, August 20th at 1 PM to hear producer Barbara Glickstein interview
Christine Gilchrist, MSN MPH RN NC_BC and Caroline Ortiz, MSN, MPH, RN, NC co-founders of Integrative Nurse Consultants . They share how they work with individuals to make behavioral changes and their vision for the future of nursing and healthcare.
So tune into WBAI, 99.5 FM in New york City, at 1:00 PM on Thursday, August 13th, to listen to the program, or go online for a live stream at www.wbai.org.

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Media Fellowship on Healthcare Workforce – Call for Applicants!

 DEADLINE EXTENDED !

APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED THROUGH AUGUST 28!

Deadline: August 14, 2015, 5pm ET

download guidelines here

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The Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York, has launched a new Healthcare Workforce Media Fellowship to train a recent graduate or early-career journalist on key aspects of reporting on healthcare and nursing workforce issues. The Fellowship is supported by a grant from Johnson & Johnson.

As the nation focuses on improving people’s experiences with care, improving health, and reducing health care costs, this fellowship will enable journalists to better understand issues and policy challenges surrounding our healthcare workforce. The goal is to improve coverage of this topic, with particular attention to the factors that affect existing and new roles of nurses and other health care providers..

The Fellow will investigate and report on a relevant topic of his or her choice for eight months, including cross-platform reporting.

The Fellow will be selected from a pool of post-graduate and early career health journalist applicants in August and will begin work with CHMP on September 16, 2015.

The Fellow will receive a stipend and support to attend a major healthcare or health journalism conference to foster networking and conversations with other journalists about nursing and workforce issues. The fellow will also have opportunities for one-on-one learning, training, and networking with experts in nursing, policy and journalism from CHMP’s national advisory council.

Who Can Apply?

Interested applicants should:

  • Be a recent graduate (<2 years) of a recognized graduate journalism school and/or
  • have worked as a journalist for no longer than five (5) years.
  • Have strong interest in and commitment to health journalism, multimedia reporting and health care workforce issues
  • Be available to meet in person with the program director and National Advisory Council members in NYC monthly as well as regular telephone or Skype conference calls. When possible, NAC, expert and program meetings will take place on the same day, to minimize travel and maximize use of Fellow’s time..
  • Commit to publishing, at minimum one multimedia report, one print article or series, and two republications on a healthcare workforce issue that includes a nursing dimension; and demonstrate use of nurses as sources on health and health care.

Requirements

Articles must be published, broadcast, or posted through distributed or circulated news media entities rather than personal blogs, and must credit writing/production in conjunction with the fellowship (Sample texts will be provided that can be adapted for different media).The stories must reach an audience within the U.S.

Short-term story: The Fellow will produce a short story of approximately 1000 words (or comparable broadcast length) on any aspect of healthcare workforce issues. While not required, it may include information or interviews stemming from meetings with members of the National Advisory Council or other CHMP expert.

The piece must be completed no later than December 24, 2015, and scheduled to be disseminated no later than January 15, 2016. Examples of short-term stories include a news report, feature, or commentary about a meeting, or expanding upon a relevant study or discussion of health workforce issues.

Applicants do not need to propose a topic for the short-term story ahead of time, nor do they have to obtain advance approval from an editor/producer that the piece will be considered as an editorial assignment for publication or broadcast. The subject matter does not have to relate to the longer-term project and can be published through a different media organization if desired. However, it is the Fellow’s responsibility to ensure pieces are published according to stated deadlines.

Therefore, applicants should indicate where they expect to pitch the short-term story if it will appear in a different news outlet than the long-term project.

Long-term project: Each applicant should submit a proposal of up to one page, outlining a major story or series that she or he intends to research and write. The story or series should be of the Fellow’s own design, focusing on a a pressing healthcare workforce issue. While not required, strong consideration will be given to ideas that pay particular attention to the factors that affect existing and new roles of nurses and other health care providers. The  Fellow is welcome to interview any NAC member or conference expert(s) as part of the piece.

The project deadline is Friday, March 18, 2016, and it must be scheduled to be disseminated no later than Saturday, April 30, 2016.

Along with the application, candidates should include an agreement from his or her editor/producer to accept the long-term project proposal as an editorial assignment for publication or broadcast.

Although the primary editor/producer for stories will be at each reporter’s news outlet, fellows will be encouraged to consult with program director Liz Seegert or CHMP co-directors Diana Mason and Barbara Glickstein for help with sources and background.

Dissemination

The stories resulting from this fellowship will first be published by the journalist’s media organization. HealthCetera, the blog of CHMP, HealthStyles Radio, and New America Media then have the option to cross-post the stories — with full credit and links back to the primary publisher — and make them available to member Pacifica stations or, in the case of NAM, its network of ethnic media outlets. Stories or broadcast reports must include appropriate supporting text (to be supplied) to the Fellowship, CHMP, and the Johnson & Johnson Foundation.

If necessary, CHMP and NAM editors may adapt reports to their specific format(s). The Fellow will have the right of final approval on any editing prior to publication or air.

Stipend and Travel

The fellow will receive a stipend of $1,500, with half to be paid on start of the fellowship and the remainder upon completion of the long-term project. CHMP will reimburse the Fellow up to $1,000 for travel, meals and expenses to attend one national journalism or healthcare conference or two regional conferences.

Selection Process and Eligibility

The fellowship selection panel will include journalism, nursing, and policy experts from the Center for Health, Media & Policy. Since this is the inaugural year of the Media Fellowship, the application process is open to any post-graduate or early-career journalist (<5 years’ experience).

Additional Information

For further details about fellowship requirements and potential stories, contact Liz Seegert, Program Director, Center for Health, Media & Policy at liz@healthmediapolicy.com. Be sure to put “Media Fellow” in the subject line.

Application Process

Applications must be submitted in a single Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF file consisting of the following  components:

A cover letter containing:

  • Applicant name
  • Mailing address
  • Office phone
  • Mobile phone
  • E-mail
  • Employer (Freelancers please specify the length of affiliation with the outlet that will publish or broadcast the story.)
  • Employer address
  • Employer phone
  • Employer’s circulation and audience demographic (Please indicate whether this media outlet serves a general audience or a specific community.)
  1. A resume.
  2. A proposal (up to one page) or outline describing an idea for long-term project topic, , its relevance to the audience, and why you chose to cover the issue.
  3. A letter from an editor/producer agreeing to accept the long-term project proposal as an editorial assignment for publication or broadcast.
  4. No more than three samples of published or broadcast journalistic work. For applicants submitting print samples, the full story text should be included in the application document. For applicants submitting broadcast samples, please include hyperlinks to these stories — either on a news organization’s website or a file sharing site such as filesanywhere.com — in the application document.

Applications that are not submitted in a single Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF file will not be reviewed. Please submit the file (using a file name format of “LastnameFirstname.doc” or “LastnameFirstname.pdf”) using the following link: http://bit.ly/1h0FhIO

Deadline: August 28, 2015; 5pm ET

Applicants will be notified on or before September 4, and selected candidate should be available for an introductory meeting on Wednesday, September 16, in New York City.

About CHMP

The Center for Health, Media and Policy (CHMP) is an interdisciplinary initiative for advancing the health of the public and healthy public policies. CHMP is a catalyst for shaping crucial conversations about health and health care through media, research, education, and public forums. This media fellowship is an extension of the Center’s mission, designed to increase awareness and encourage debate of critical health and policy issues. The Center was co-founded and is co-directed by Barbara Glickstein, MS, MPH, RN, and Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, producers of the radio program, Healthstyles, for 30 years.

 

Healthstyles: Health and Social Challenges our nation faces

Tune in to CHMP’s Healthstyles Radio Thursday, June 18th, from 1:00 to 2:00 PM on WBAI, 99.5 FM in New York City and streamed online here.  In this segment of Healthstyles you’ll hear this:

Co-Producer Liz Seegert takes an in-depth look at some of New York’s diverse family caregivers and learns that most face similar challenges. Ms. Seegert’s report is part of a journalist-in-aging fellowship from the gerontological society of america and new america media, sponsored by the silver century foundation.

Next time, Liz Seegert will report on one center that offers caregivers some respite by giving their loved one the next best thing to home.

Graduate Fellow Kristin Westphaln’s segment;  Tale from the Crib: How sex trafficking could appear appealing to an adolescent

Healthstyles presents a “pimped out” tale from the crib as Kristi Westphaln tackles the topic of sex trafficking with a teen-aged twist.  The discussion of how sex trafficking could appear appealing to adolescents is joined by Ohio based expert pediatric nurse practitioner, Dr. Gail Hornor. Join Westphaln and Hornor as they define domestic minor sex trafficking, highlight teen-specific risk factors, identify  the long term consequences of involvement in sex trafficking, and focus on resiliency factors that can help protect our teens.

Help us to turn off the trafficking light.

As adolescent recruitment into sex trafficking exists,

we must empower teens with tools to resist.

Protect with all senses: look, listen, and feel.

Adolescence can be rough- but hope and love are real.

Healthstyles in produced by the Center for Health, Media and Policy. To hear archives of previous programs search here.

Healthstyles: In Awe of Being Human & Jen Sorensen Political Cartoonist

Tune in to CHMP’s Healthstyles Radio Thursday, April 16th, from 1:00 to 2:00 PM on WBAI, 99.5 FM in New York City and streamed online here. 

In this segment of Healthstyles you’ll hear co-host Barbara Glickstein interview Betsy MacGregor, author of In Awe of Being Human: A Doctor’s Stories from the Edge of Life and Death.  Dr. MacGregor worked as a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist at Beth Israel Medical Center for 30 years. She shares reflections on living, healing and dying set amidst the challenging world of hospitals and hospices, the medical professionals who work in them, and the ever-present mystery of life and death. You can find out more about the book here.  Listen to the full interview.

Glickstein then interviews political cartoonist Jen Sorensen a nationally-syndicated political cartoonist whose work has appeared in The Progressive, The Nation, Daily Kos, Austin Chronicle, NPR, Ms., Politico, and many other publications. The recipient of the 2014 Herblock Prize and a 2013 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, she tweets at @JenSorensen

You can listen to the interview

JenSorensen

Healthstyles in produced by the Center for Health, Media and Policy. To hear archives of previous programs search here.

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