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Posts from the ‘Diana Mason’ Category

Healthstyles, January 29th: Reproductive Services and Breastfeeding

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The results of the national and state elections in 2014 suggest that we will continue to see efforts to restrict women’s right to abortions and access to contraception and abortion services. But even in states where the right to abortion is considered safeguarded, access to abortion services may be limited. Healthstyles producer Diana Mason, PhD, RN, interviews Diana Taylor, PhD, RN, Professor Emerita at the University of California at San Francisco School of Nursing and Research Faculty for the Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health Program, about these issues and strategies to increase this access that are underway in California and could serve as a model for other states.

On the second half of Healthstyles, Diane Spatz, PhD, RN, Professor of Perinatal Nursing and the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, talks about some of the policy issues and latest scientific findings on breastfeeding, including some fascinating information about how breast milk can actually be used as a therapeutic intervention for sick infants who cannot eat.

So tune into Healthstyles on Thursday, January 29, 2015, at 1:00 on WBAI, 99.5 FM in New York City (www.wbai.org). Or click here to listen to the program anytime:

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Healthstyles: Single Payer Down the Tubes in Vermont? And What’s Race Got to Do with Stress?

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All eyes have been on Vermont when it became the first state to commit to adopting a single payer approach to health care. But the re-elected Vermont governor recently announced that he was backing out of the plan to do so. Betty Rambur, PhD, RN, Professor of Nursing and Health Policy at the University of Vermont and one of five members of Vermont’s Green Mountain Care Board, talks with Healthstyles producer and moderator Diana Mason, PhD, RN, on Thursday, January 15, 2015, about how the state is responding to the governor’s decision.

Healthstyles Producer Kenya Beard, EdD, ANP, GNP, joins Diana Mason for the second part of Healthstyles to talk with Willie Tolliver, PhD, MSW, professor of social work at Hunter College, about the connection between discrimination and stress as an important factor in health disparities. The discussion includes responses to the recent events surrounding the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and other African Americans, and the implications for health disparities among African Americans.

So tune in on Thursday, January 15th, at 1:00 on WBAI, 99.5 FM, NYC (www.wbai.org); or click here to listen to the program:

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Healthstyles on January8, 2015: One Nurse’s Ebola Story

WBAIOne of the major stories in 2014 was the Ebola crisis. Actually, the story’s beginnings in West Africa received relatively little media attention, despite the rapid increase in new cases in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea throughout the spring and summer, with initial death rates ranging from 50% to 90%.

Then a nurse and a physician who had become sick with Ebola in West Africa were flown to the U.S. for treatment. They survived, but Donald Trump got media attention with his call to ban other American health care workers with Ebola from returning to the U.S. for treatment.

On September 30th, the CDC reported that the first case of Ebola had been diagnosed in the U.S. Thomas Eric Duncan was a Liberian man who arrived by plane in Dallas, Texas, at the end of September to visit his finance. Prior to leaving Liberia, he had been with people who had Ebola. Duncan became ill, and was initially sent home after being seen at Dallas Presbyterian Hospital. But he got sicker and subsequently tested positive for Ebola. He was hospitalized at Dallas Presbyterian and died on October 8th. He was the first person to die of Ebola in the US.

The media frenzy began.

The diagnosis of two people coming into the U.S. with Ebola and two nurses becoming ill after exposure in a U.S. hospital led to an escalation of media coverage of Ebola that bordered on fear-mongering. It led to calls for banning flights from West Africa and quarantining all Americans who have contact with people with Ebola. But the initial media coverage brought hope to those who knew that bringing public attention to the health, humanitarian, and economic impact of Ebola in West Africa was essential to get the West’s attention and resources to bear on the crisis. Unfortunately, American media’s attention was on Ebola in America, with only limited attention to what was going on in West Africa.

The media is fickle. One minute media coverage of one issue is unrelenting and terribly redundant. The next minute, there’s no attention to the issue. It’s been six weeks since Craig Spencer was discharged from New York’s Bellevue Hospital and over two months since a case of Ebola was diagnosed in this country. What media coverage of what is happening in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea have you seen?

The silence is deafening, as we approach 20,000 cases of Ebola in West Africa, almost 8000 of whom have died, compared with 4 cases in the U.S. and one death of a man who was diagnosed late in the illness.

On Thursday, January 8, 2015, at 1:00 PM, Healthstyles once again focuses on the story of Ebola. Host Diana Mason, RN, PhD, interviews nurse Deborah Wilson, RN, a nurse who spent six weeks in Foya, Liberia, caring for patients at an Ebola Treatment Center run by Doctors Without Borders. Her return to the U.S. coincided with the two Dallas nurses being diagnosed with Ebola, so she experienced the paranoia of friends, family, and colleagues whose fear of becoming infected was out of proportion to the realities of the disease. Mason and Wilson reflect on what happened in 2014 and what the implications are for 2015.

So tune into Healthstyles on January 8th, from 1:00 to 1:55 PM on WBAI, 99.5 FM, New York City, or at http://www.wbai.org. To listen to the interview any time, click here:

Healthstyles on December 11: Choosing Wisely and Women’s Economic Development

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There’s an old saying that “women hold up half the sky”. But around the world, women–and thus their families–are living in poverty with little access to the education that can help them to make a decent living and promote the health of their families. A longstanding international development practice has targeted investments in women’s enterprises, particularly in small businesses and agriculture. These investments have involved partnerships among public, private and philanthropic sectors. But one nurse is advocating that its time to invest in the education and work of female nurses and midwives in low income countries–and that doing so would not only be a wise investment in women’s education and economic development, but could also strengthen local health systems and reduce maternal and infant mortality.

This week’s Healthstyles program opens with producer and co-host Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, talking this nurse about her new approach to women’s economic development in low resource countries. The nurse is Marla Salmon, ScD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Global Public health, and Senior Visiting Fellow at the Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington. She is also a member of the Institute of Medicine where she has worked on developing this idea and building multi-sector support for it. You can listen to the interview here:

The second half of Healthstyles focuses on unnecessary care. The United States spent between $158 billion and $226 billion on overtreatment in 2011. This overtreatment includes unnecessary tests and procedures that can be harmful and costly. For example, pregnant women who deliver in a hospital are often put on continuous electronic monitoring of fetal heart rate ostensibly to ensure that the soon-to-be-born baby is not in distress. But the monitoring means that the laboring woman is unable to move around, which can slow down the labor, and misinterpretation of the monitoring can lead to unnecessary inducement of labor or Caesarean sections that can jeopardize the health and outcomes for both the mother and the infant.

So why do we do these unnecessary tests and procedures and how do we know what is unnecessary? Choosing Wisely is designed to help the public identify which tests and procedures should be questioned if recommended by a provider. On the second half of Healthstyles, Diana Mason discusses the problem of unnecessary care and the Choosing Wisely initiative with Daniel Wolfson, MHSA, Executive Vice President of the ABIM Foundation that developed Choosing Wisely; Karen Cox, RN, PhD, FAAN, Chief Operating Officer of Mercy Children’s Hosptial in Kansas City, MO, and the chair of the American Academy of Nursing’s Task Force for selecting nursing’s list of Choosing Wisely recommendations; and Lisa Woodward, Vice President of Nursing Education at Doctors Hospital at Rennaisance in Edinburg, Texas, and Co-leader of the South Region for the Texas Action Coalition that is involved in promoting the use of the Choosing Wisely list throughout the state.

You can listen to the segment on unnecessary care and Choosing Wisely here:

So tune in for Healthstyles on Thursday, December 11, 2014, on WBAI in New York City at 99.5 FM or online at wbai.org.

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

 

Choosing Wisely: Policy or Professional and Patient Responsibility?

choosing Wisely

My latest blog post on JAMA News Forum is on the Choosing Wisely initiative that was started by the ABIM (American Board of Internal Medicine) Foundation. The initiative identifies unnecessary and sometimes harmful and costly tests and procedures that should be eliminated or seldom done. The aim is to have physicians and patients use the lists (developed by various professional societies) to have conversations about testing and treating that can reduce unnecessary care. My JAMA blog discusses whether we need policy changes to be able to move more quickly on incorporating these discussions into care, whether through penalizing their use or incentivizing the crucial conversations about what care is necessary and safe and what care is not.

As of October, the initiative now includes the first-five list of nursing-identified unnecessary care, through work being led by the American Academy of Nursing (disclosure: I’m the Academy’s president). That list includes:

“1. Don’t automatically initiate continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor for women without risk factors; consider intermittent auscultation first.

2. Don’t let older adults lay in bed or only get up to a chair during their hospital stay.

3. Don’t use physician restraints with an older hospitalized patient.

4. Don’t wake the patient for routine care unless the patient’s condition or care specifically requires it.

5. Don’t place or maintain a urinary catheter in a patient unless there is a specific indication to do so.”

I hope that all health care professionals and organizations will share the Choosing Wisely work with colleagues, health care organizations, and the public.

Diana J. Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, Rudin Professor of Nursing

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