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Posts from the ‘Diana Mason’ Category

Admit to Observation: Policy Run Amuck?

My latest blog post on JAMA’s News Forum is about the unintended consequences of policy. Specifically, it deals with Medicare policy on admitting patients to hospitals as outpatients for observation. It clearly needs to be fixed.

JAMA doesn’t permit people to post comments on their blog so I welcome your comments on this site.

Diana J. Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, Rudin Professor of Nursing

Healthstyles Today: Ebola and Breastfeeding

wbaiThe World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that 20,000 people will be infected with the Ebola virus before the current crisis in West Africa is contained. Earlier in the week, it reported that 120 health care workers have died from the disease, leaving unafflicted doctors, nurses, and other health care workers with fewer human resources to care for those who become ill from Ebola. In some cases, remaining health care workers have refused to work and whole hospitals have closed because of insufficient staff. The WHO has issued a roadmap to contain the spread of the virus but some believe that the international response to the spread of Ebola has been woefully insufficient.

Today on Healthstyles, producer and host Diana J. Mason, PhD, RN, interviews Kate Mort, Director of Human Resources for Medecin Sans Frontieres (MSF) or Doctors Without Borders, about the challenges this NGO faces in West Africa, particularly Monrovia, Liberia, as well as the response of the international community and need for volunteers to help to contain the spread of this deadly disease in which only 47% of those infected with the virus are surviving.

The program opens with HealthCetera, an update on health news, and ends with an interview with Nancy Manister, PhD, RN, FNP, Assistant Professor of nursing at Fairfield University in Connecticut about breastfeeding as part of a national conversation this month to raise awareness of the importance of breastfeeding to mother, baby, family, and society. You can listen to the interview here:

So tune in at 1:00 today on WBAI, 99.5 FM (www.wbai.org) in New York City.

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Deaths From Ebola Without Infection

wbaiThe number of people infected with Ebola is now over 2,200, with more than 1,200 people dying from the virus. But the death toll from Ebola in Liberia may be much higher as it seriously compromises the country’s health care system.  Buzzfeed’s Jina Moore reported from Monrovia this week that the country’s Minister of Health estimates that 75% of the deaths are women who are in formal or informal caregiving roles. This includes nurses, who have been infected while caring for patients. Some of these patients were thought not to be infected but later died from the virus. Others were known to be infected, but the nurses and others caring for seriously ill patients with Ebola have been lacking the personal protective equipment that we take for granted in the U.S.  In a nation that already suffered from a shortage of nurses and other health care workers, Ebola has killed some health care workers and has caused others to leave hospitals. Those needing health care for other reasons may fear going to hospitals or clinics and, if they do go, may find that the hospital has closed because it doesn’t have enough staff. Pregnant women who needed help with complicated deliveries have died, and it is estimated that people with other health conditions other than Ebola are also dying because of a lack of health care.

Today on Healthstyles, c0-producer and host Diana Mason, PhD, RN, talks with three nurses with recent experience in Liberia about that nation’s capacity for delivering health care now and in the future: Harriette Dolo, Liberian certified midwife and registered nurse who is Director of the Esther Bacon School of Nursing and Midwifery at Curran Lutheran Hospital in Zorzor, Lofa County, Liberia (the county with the highest incidence of Ebola); Dorcas Kunkel, DNP, RN, APHN, assistant clinical professor of nursing at the University of Minnesota and volunteer faculty at the Mother Patern College of Health Sciences in Monrovia, Liberia; and Magdeline Aagard, RN, EdD, nurse educator and international consultant who is also a volunteer faculty at the Mother Patern College of Health Sciences.

Tune in today at 1:00 to Healthstyles on WBAI, 99.5 FM (www.wbai.org), or click here to listen to the interview:

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Healthstyles Today: “Observation Status”–Policy Gone Wrong?

wbaiAcross the country, people on Medicare who become ill are being admitted to hospitals on what is called “observation status” or “admit to observation” to provide regular assessments to ensure that the patient’s condition doesn’t deteriorate and require a higher level of care. Medicare pays less for observation status since it’s assumed that the patient needs less care. It makes sense, but in reality it’s creating huge problems for some of the patients, their families and the hospitals. The issue has become a national concern and New York State has responded with legislation aimed to provide some protection for Medicare patients who are admitted to the state’s hospitals.

Today on Healthstyles on WBAI 9.5 FM (www.wbai.org), producer and host Diana Mason, RN, PhD, talks about this issue with Toby Edelman, Senior Policy Attorney in the Washington, DC, office of the Center for Medicare Advocacy. You can listen to the interview here:

The program will open  with HealthCetera, Healthstyles’ highlights of health news that today includes information about Ebola; followed by a discussion with new Healthstyles producer, Kenya Beard, RN, EdD, ANP, about the recent report on health disparities by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. You can listen to this interview here:

Today’s program opens with HealthCetera, Healthstyles’ highlights of health news.

So tune in today at 1:00 to WBAI, 99.5 FM.

Healthstyles is sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Healthstyles Today: Medicare and a New Online Mental Health Service

wbaiToday on Healthstyles on WBAI, 99.5 FM (www.wbai.org) at 1:00, producer and moderator Diana Mason, RN, hosts a program that opens with HealthCetera, a health news updated, followed by a discussion of Medicare by c0-producer Liz Seegert with Stacey Sanders, Federal Policy Director of the Medicare Rights Center, a national non-profit organization that helps older adults and people with disabilities to get health coverage through counseling, advocacy, educational programs and public policy initiatives.

The program then airs an interview that Mason did with Jen Hyatt, founder and CEO of Big White Wall, an online service that helps individuals get support, take control and feel better, by creating an anonymous and safe space to share and access personalized pathways to recovery via a supportive online community and proactive self-management services, facilitated by experienced guides. Big White Wall was named a High Impact Innovation by the UK National Health Service and as the best eHealth solution developed by an SME (Small and Medium Sized Enterprise) across the European Union.

You can listen to the program by clicking here:

Healthstyles if sponsored by the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York.

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